Félix Guattari; The Anti-Œdipus Papers

Félix Guattari; The Anti-Œdipus Papers Full book

Notes and journal entries document Guattari and Deleuze’s collaboration on their 1972 book Anti-Œdipus.

“The unconscious is not a theatre, but a factory,“ wrote Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari in Anti-Œdipus (1972), instigating one of the most daring intellectual adventures of the las half-century. Together, the well-known philosopher and the activist-psychiatrist were updating both psychoanalysis and Marxism in light of a more radical and “constructivist“ vision of capitalism:“Capitalism is the exterior limit of all societies because it has no exterior limit itself. It works well as long as it keeps breaking down.“ Few people at the time believed, as they wrote in the often-quoted opening senctence of Rhizome, that “the two of us wrote Anti-Œdipus together.“ They added, “Since each of us was several, that became quite a crowd.“ These notes, addressed to Deleuze by Guattari in preparation for Anti-Œdipus, and annotated by Deleuze, substantiate their claim, finally bringing out the factory behind the theatre. They reveal Guattari as an inventive, highly analytical, mathematically-minded “conceptur,“ arguably one of the most prolific and enigmatic figures in philosophy and sociopolitical theory today. The Anti-Œdipus Papers (1969-1973) are supplemented by substantial journal entries in which Guattari describes his turbulent relationship with his analyst and teacher Jacques Lacan, his apprehensions about the publication of Anti-Œdipus and accounts of his personal and professional life as a private analyst and codirector with Jean Oury of the experimental clinic La Borde (created in the 1950s).

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