Jerome Rothenberg | Autobiography 1977 The First One Hundred

     1  Archipelago of the wandering dream    2  A castle with two bodies    3  The figure of Rosa Luxemburg among the animals in cages    4  Midnight forest    5  Trains circling below the icy waters    6  A meeting in the bourse    7  The men come into the small locker room & order drinks    8  Picasso wears a hat with roses    9  He has shoes aglow with little lights 10  Electricity runs along the floor & in between the tables 11  Picasso & Rosa Luxemburg converse 12  Her face is the face of our…

César Vallejo | From ‘Art and Revolution’

    THE REVOLUTIONARY FUNCTION OF THOUGHT Confusion is a phenomenon with a permanent, organic character in bourgeois society. Confusion grows ever thicker when it is addressed as already confusing problems by the very historical terms of its utterance. The latter occurs with the brand new and, at once, very old problem of the intellectual’s obligations with regard to revolution. As posed by historical materialists, this problem is already a tangle. When formulated or simply outlined by bourgeois intellectuals, it acquires the aspect of insoluble chaos. *** “The philosophers,” Marx says, “have only interpreted the world in various ways. The…

Two Poets — Marion Bell & Jasmine Gibson

  Marion Bell   You’re one of the only poets I know who dropped out of a prominent MFA program. Why? Ok, so I’ll try to answer as candidly as possible. I will have to travel back in time to 24/25 year old me. (I’m in this position a lot lately – I’m working with my past, my younger self in writing – the self I like to think is more fucked up and vulnerable than my present self. What is that relationship – how can I be accountable for the choices I’ve made even when they seem like the…

César Vallejo | The Complete Poetry (A Bilingual Edition)

THE COMPLETE POETRY CÉSAR VALLEJO EDITED AND TRANSLATED BY CLAYTON ESHLEMAN AN INTRODUCTION BY EFRAIN KRISTAL AND A CHRONOLOGY BY STEPHEN M. HART ⇒ PDF       This first translation of the complete poetry of Peruvian César Vallejo (1892-1938) makes available to English speakers one of the greatest achievements of twentieth-century world poetry. Handsomely presented in facing-page Spanish and English, this volume, translated by National Book Award winner Clayton Eshleman, includes the groundbreaking collections The Black Heralds (1918), Trilce (1922), Human Poems (1939), and Spain, Take This Cup from Me (1939). Vallejo’s poetry takes the Spanish language to an unprecedented level of emotional rawness and stretches its grammatical…

Galina Rymbu | Devoid of signs (fragments)

DEVOID OF SIGNS (FRAGMENTS) devoid of signs, not men not women beyond categories and tribesdesolate landscapes devoid of the power of recognition their memories are short and remembering matter impregnating spaces disconnected from the bodies that inhabit the disaster zone ( . . .) this is the book of decay, it loads the limits of memory, a plane bearing the shards of creation, devoid of signs, that are swept by the winds of transfiguration. devoid of signs – a mother and the vein that pulses in her neck. a small, cramped bar. its walls are painted black. drowsing while he takes…

Sergio Raimondi | Poems

  When the world changes, literature must as well. This is the credo motivating the thinking and writing of Argentine poet Sergio Raimondi, born in 1968 in Bahia Blanca. A somewhat gruff genius loci inhabits this place: the nearby port of Ingeniero White is one of Argentina’s main seaports; the nation’s most important petrochemical complexes is also located here. But Sergio Raimondi draws his very inspiration from this genius loci: even in his early work Poesía civil (published in German as Zivilpoesie in 2005), Raimondi—who teaches contemporary literature at the Universidad del Sur in Bahia Blanca—examines in depth Argentina’s changing…

Antonin Artaud : Years of Incarceration | by Stephen Barber

The asylum incarceration which Artaud underwent in the years from 1937 to 1946 has as much contradiction and productivity as the other phases of his life. But it was certainly the most deeply painful phase. The internment began with a period of self-preoccupation which Artaud broke only to berate his doctors and to demand external confirmation for the hallucinations he was experiencing. During the early part of Artaud’s internment, at Rouen and Sainte-Anne, his behaviour gives the impression of great austerity and of a profound, self-sufficient calm. Although he spent his time in the company of the many different kinds…