GHOSTS ((A-234))

(i) … wir sind nichts als abgegriffene Bilder zeitgenössischer Vorstellungen. Das tragen wir dir nicht nach… aus dunklen Augenhöhlen brennt in eiskalter Berechnung der Tod Rimbauds das Hirn sich weggeblasen mit einem der 1440 Perkussionsschloss-Gewehren die absteigende Karawane ((Soldaten des guten Willens)) / Schauder der Büßermondlandschaft Abessiniens nasstriefende Trepanationen & Vokale ((Licht der additiven Farbmischung)) / die logischen Revolten für den Anfang :: Triebfeder zerschlagener Ideen, langue à langue kartographiert im Schwarz getünchter Schadensregister     (ii) kein Sterblicher der nicht in einem beliebigen Augenblick seines Daseins mit Zittern und Abscheu die seltsame Geschichte betrachtet die Versuche Luxus zu geniessen…

The Secret Art of Antonin Artaud | Jacques Derrida & Paule Thévenin

Translation and preface by Mary Ann Caws Antonin Artaud – stage and film actor, director, writer, drug addict, and visual artist – was a man of rage and genius. The Secret Art of Antonin Artaud is the first English translation of two famous texts on his drawings and portraits. In one, Jacques Derrida examines the works that he first saw on the walls of Paule Thévenin’s apartment. His text, as frenzied as Artaud’s, struggles with Artaud’s peculiar language and is punctuated by footnotes and asides the reflect this strain (“How will they translate this?”). The more straightforward text of Paule…

Antonin Artaud | Interjections [Suppôts et Suppliciations]

  Wednesday 27 November 1946 at twenty-three hours in the evening beings that have not swallowed the nail, but have swallowed the point, and have held themselves between the hard and the soft, those one cannot disintricate because if one looks for them in the breath they take refuge in the body, and if one looks for them at one point on the body they claim to be braided there in breath, lightning gashing the body like a negation of body, having more body than all breath. They collect in the body, outside of the one who controls this body…

‘[A] poet must know more than | a surface suggests’: Reading and Secrecy in the Poetry of Anna Mendelssohn; by Vicky Sparrow

  There are moments when the reader of Anna Mendelssohn’s poetry feels themselves to be initiated into a secret poetic world within her work; and there are moments when such a reader is explicitly, sometimes uncomfortably, disabused of such a fantasy, debarred from such a space. The construction and reading of poetry always requires a negotiation of what is part-private and part-public, and in Mendelssohn’s work the crossing between these can feel peculiarly perilous. In Implacable Art (2000) Mendelssohn titles and addresses a poem ‘to any who want poems to give them answers’, cautioning her readers: ‘a poem is not…

Gilles Deleuze & Félix Guattari | May ’68 Did Not Take Place

  In historical phenomena such as the revolution of 1789, the Commune, the revolution of 1917, there is always one part of the event that is irreducible to any social determinism, or to causal chains. Historians are not very fond of this point: they restore causality after the fact. Yet the event itself is a splitting off from, a breaking with causality; it is a bifurcation, a lawless deviation, an unstable condition that opens up a new field of the possible. In physics, Ilya Prigogine spoke of states in which the slightest differences persist rather than cancel themselves out, and…

Kristin Ross; May ’68 and its Afterlives

Kristin Ross; MAY ’68 AND ITS AFTERLIVES (Full book) During May 1968, students and workers in France united in the biggest strike and the largest mass movement in French history. Protesting capitalism, American imperialism, and Gaullism, 9 million people from all walks of life, from shipbuilders to department store clerks, stopped working. The nation was paralyzed—no sector of the workplace was untouched. Yet, just thirty years later, the mainstream image of May ’68 in France has become that of a mellow youth revolt, a cultural transformation stripped of its violence and profound sociopolitical implications. Kristin Ross shows how the current…

Jacques Rancière; Disagreement: Politics and Philosophy

Jacques Rancière; Disagreement: Politics and Philosophy (Full book) “Is there any such thing as political philosophy?” So begins this provocative book by one of the foremost figures in Continental thought. Here, Jacques Rancière brings a new an highly useful set of terms to the vexed debate about political effectiveness and “the en of politics.” What precisely is at stake in the relationship between “philosophy” and the adjective “political”? In Disagreement, Rancière explores the apparent contradiction between these terms and reveals the uneasy meaning of their union in the phrase “political philosophy”—a juncture related to age-old attempts in philosophy to answer…

Aimé Césaire; From “Notebook of a Return to the Native Land (1939)”

Translated by A. James Arnold and Clayton Eshleman 1 At the end of the small hours burgeoning with frail coves the hungry Antilles, the Antilles pitted with smallpox, the Antilles dynamited by alcohol, stranded in the mud of this bay, in the dust of this town sinisterly stranded. 2 At the end of the small hours, the extreme, deceptive desolate eschar on the wound of the waters; the martyrs who do not bear witness; the flowers of blood that fade and scatter in the empty wind like the cries of babbling parrots; an aged life mendaciously smiling, its lips opened…

Aimé Césaire; Discourse on Colonialism

Aimé Césaire; Discours on Colonialism (Full book)   A Poetics of Anticolonialism; by Robin D.G. Kelly Aimé Césaire’s Discourse on Colonialism might be best described as a declaration of war. I would almost call it a “third world manifesto,” but hesitate because it is primarily a polemic against the old order bereft of the kind of propositions and proposals that generally accompany manifestos. Yet, Discourse speaks in revolutionary cadences, capturing the spirit of its age just as Marx and Engels did 102 years earlier in their little manifesto. First published in 1950 as Discours sur le colonialisme1, it appeared just…

Amelia Rosselli | Poetry and Poetics

  Poetry and Poetics   Uncollected   Because I never did die, sepia and self with others was jocund smashed in equal pieces. I write obscure, blissful fog and without sun the sky, floured with wearinesses the monotonies of living by jolts acute and low. 11 March 1995     Note 1967-1968   1/1/67 Intent upon describing the landscape I intruded; gushed from it restless the primary scene: spinning tops, caverns, demystifying scenes. It’s a scene this one that keeps me from thinking while with a machine gun I elegantly mow you all down. What a corvée of madmen! What…

Jacques Rancière; Althusser’s Lesson

Jacques Rancière, Althusser’s Lesson (Full book) Jacques Rancière’s first major work, Althusser’s Lesson appeared in 1974, just as the energies of May 68 were losing ground to the calls for a return to order. Rancière’s analysis of Althusserian Marxism unfolds against this background: what is the relationship between the return to order and the enthusiasm which greeted the publication of Althusser’s Reply to John Lewis in 1973? How to explain the rehabilitation of a philosophy that had been declared ‘dead and buried on the barricades of May 68’? What had changed? The answer to this question takes the form of…

Eduardo Viveiros de Castro; The Untimely Again

  The Untimely, Again (on Pierre Clastres; Archeology of Violence) & Pierre Clastres; THE ARCHEOLOGY OF VIOLENCE (Full book)     Savages want the multiplication of the multiple. — Pierre Clastres   Relearning to read Pierre Clastres Archeology of Violence, published in French in 1980 under the title of Recherches d’anthropologie politique, gathers texts that were written, in their majority, shortly before the death of their author three years earlier. It forms a pair with a collection of articles published in 1974, Society Against the State. If the latter has a greater internal consistency, and has a larger number of articles…

[[das Phantom Lautréamonts]]

                    »Da gab es keinen Zwang mehr. Wenn ich töten wollte, tötete ich; das passierte mir sogar oft, und niemand hinderte mich daran. Die menschlichen Gesetze verfolgten mich noch mit ihrer Rache, obwohl ich die Rasse, die ich so ruhig verlassen hatte, nicht angriff; aber mein Gewissen machte mir keinen Vorwurf…« Die Gesänge des Maldoror   ich hatte angenommen dass wir am 10. die Paläste der Hochfinanz & des Inneren auf den Kopf stellen / du weisst schon : die Rechnung für entlauste, desinfizierte Randbezirke / verarscht & geknüppelt wie wir…

Nanni Balestrini; »If you read this, you must no longer fear anything«

  • We Want Everything • Nanni Balestrini and the Poetry of the Italian Autonomia • Blackout • Carbonia (We Were All Communists) • On Nanni Balestrini, the Most Radically Poet of the Italian Scene     WE WANT EVERYTHING THE STRUGGLE These guys I’d talked to about the struggle couldn’t accept it, they didn’t know what the fuck to do. They didn’t understand what I was proposing. They felt somehow that what I was proposing was right, but they didn’t know how to act on it. They didn’t understand that the important thing was to stir things up all…

Anmerkungen zum Geschehen ((Totenklage))

                    Das griechischtragische Wort ist tödlich-faktisch, weil der Leib, den es ergreift, wirklich tötet. Hölderlin     Ohne Zweifel ist dies von allen widerlichen Momenten der widerlichste : es reicht nicht länger zu sagen : Ziel ist die Aufhebung des Kapitalistischen Realismus : oder Verse an die Tür einer Zelle zu hämmern wie man einen Nagel in eine Wand schlägt, wenn eine enthemmte Politkaste als Urheber täglich neuer Demütigungen, uns die verbliebenen Krumen vom Tischtuch eines inszenierten Abendmahls zuspielt / dass ich auf solch eine Vermessenheit reagieren muss wird dir klar…

Jacques Rancière; The Unforgettable

    1 In front of the camera lens It is an image from turn-of-the-century Saint Petersburg, both ordinary and extraordinary at the same time. The imperial family is passing by, surrounded by an escort of officers and dignitaries. The crowd gathered there, at the side of the road, is addressed by an officer with an imperious gesture: when the Tsar passes, the thing to do is to remove your hat. The commentator’s voice is heard: I don’t want this image to be forgotten. What is Chris Marker trying to tell us by placing this image at the opening of…

Félix Guattari; The Capitalist Revolution

  THE CAPITALIST REVOLUTION Fundamental political and micropolitical stakes are ‘negotiated’ through this Collective equipment function in so far as it retains a preponderant place in the formation of the collective power of capitalist labour. But the transformation of ‘polymorphous’ desire into useful activity, into deterritorialised labour and the exchange over which it presides, doesn’t go without saying. Capitalism has only been able to realise this transformation – and thus to place the libido in its service – under particular historical conditions. After the ‘black hole’ of the thirteenth century, the ‘Peace of God’: a religious machine The birth of…

Félix Guattari; Bourgeoisie and Capitalist Flows

  BOURGEOISIE AND CAPITALIST FLOWS The bourgeois machine One ought to distinguish here between the apparent Power [Pouvoir] of the nobility and the real power [puissance] of the bourgeoisie. At the molecular level, the real power of processes of deterritorialisation tends to escape from molar Power. The tacit equilibria, the networks of interdependence, didn’t stop being worked over, called into question, by the deterritorialised semiotic budding of the urban bourgeoisie. From this point of view, the ecclesiastical theory of ‘three orders’ (the division of society according to a divine plan into workers, warriors and people of prayer is an illusion:…

Félix Guattari; A Molecular Revolution

  A MOLECULAR REVOLUTION   The third industrial revolution The breaks between professional life, leisure and education, between private life and public life, the valorisation of serious mindedness, even being self-sacrificing, when it is a question of labour, seem to constitute the very foundations of every society. Despite the evolution of the techniques and modes of organisation of production, in ‘experimental’ sectors in particular, the traditional imagery of the ‘world of work’, the faciality traits of the manual labourer of the nineteenth century – those of the miner or the railworker for example – continue to serve as the basis…

molekulare revolution 1.1

                  molekulare revolution 1.1   1.1.1 das Herz ist seiner Zeit voraus aus der Bahn lebendigen Wirkens gerissen gibt es keine Sympathien zu verschenken die Wut kocht in deinen Händen Schwarze Unbekannte, gingen wir los! Los! los! Unheil! 1.1.2 während du die Hölle hinabsteigst steigt die Hölle zu dir hinauf Treppenhäuser aus Blut und Glut schwarze Waffen des Kapitals das Ausweiden fremder Kadaver und eine komplette Generation angeschissen 1.1.3 diese Zeilen sind nicht willkürlich vielmehr eine Art Gegen-Gebet keine Lust auf Kniefälle oder sich die Handgelenke aufzuschlitzen man fragt wie es weitergeht…

Fredric Jameson | Rimbaud and the Spatial Text

I want to see if I can make a very schematic contribution to the problem of the preconditions, the conditions of possibility, of a particular realization of what we generally call modernism, namely the poetry of Arthur Rimbaud. The problem I want to focus on has to be initially distinguished from both the analysis of that poetry and its interpretation. But the question of the “objective” conditions of possibility of these texts must also be differentiated from the biographical approach, even from those sophisticated contemporary psycho-biographies which offer an expanded sense of the very complex determinations in the construction of…

Alain Badiou; Pierre Guyotat, Prince of Prose

I say that Pierre Guyotat is the prince of prose. What does ‘prince’ mean? It signals first of all Guyotat’s nobility, the extraordinary nobility of his prose: a nobility without precedent since the speeches and sermons of Bossuet; and one that is all the more striking in that it organizes, or ennobles, materials drawn from the base layers of our existence, from the atoms of exposed flesh. Sex and cruelty, visible and solar, hook up with being qua excremental being: the word putains, ‘whores’, designates in prose the subsoil of the sublime order established by the retreat of the gods….

Jacques Rancière; Seeing Things Through Things / Moscow, 1926

And it is not only in its formal achievements, not only because A Sixth Part of the World is a new word in cinema, the victory of fact over invention, that this film is valuable. It has managed, perhaps for the first time, to show all at once the whole sixth part of the world; it has found the words to force us to be amazed, to feel the whole power, and strength, and unity; it has managed to infect the viewer too with lofty emotion, to throw him onto the screen. In the dusty steppes there are herds of…

Pierre Guyotat; by John Taylor

  «A new book by Pierre Guyotat (b. 1940) is always an “event,” little matter whether one reads it. When Progénitures appeared in France, to the sort of consternated fanfare that has frequently greeted this writer’s output, one well-placed critic declared that neither he nor anyone else could, or would, read all eight hundred, bizarrely spelled, meticulously versified pages of this “novel” that is probably more akin to an extended Old Testament chronicle. This accusation of “unreadablenes,” attached to Guyotat’s strange and provocative work ever since (at least) the lexical and orthographic experiments of Prostitution (1975), is nonetheless qualified by…

Lorenzo Chiesa; Lacan with Artaud

    The multiple theoretical overlappings between Artaud and Lacan are marked by the silent eloquence of a bio-graphical half-saying. It is possible to locate only a single place in the entire corpus of Lacan’s writings, seminars and conferences in which he speaks directly of Artaud: in “Raison d’un échec”, Lacan threatens to “sedate” those of his followers who would be inclined to behave like him. Indeed, their sole actual encounter had been a clinical one: Doctor Lacan visited the inmate Artaud in 1938, shortly after his hospitalisation in Saint Anne. On that occasion he declared: “Artaud is obsessed, he…

Katerina Gogou / AUTOPSY REPORT

  AUTOPSY REPORT 2.11.75 …the body lay face-down in a parallel connecting to the Vatican. One of his hands full of blood gestured in open palm as insult to CPI and the other clutching his genitals to the culture specialists. Blood clotting on his hair as leeches on the veiled homosexual syndromes of all men of earth throughout the realm. His face disfigured by the framework of the class he denied a black and blue volunteer of the ragtag proletariat. The fingers of the left hand broken by social realism thrown away to floodlit trash. The jaw broken by the…

Georges Didi-Huberman; To Render Sensible

  Representable People, Imaginary People? Representation of the people comes up against a double difficulty, if not a double aporia, that comes from the impossibility of our subsuming each of the two terms, “representation” and “people,” into the unity of one concept. Hannah Arendt said that we will never manage to think about the political dimension as long as we stubbornly persist in speaking of man, since politics is interested precisely in something else, which is men, whose multiplicity is modulated differently each time, whether it be in conflict or community. (1) Likewise we must say, and forcefully, that we…

Deleuze/Guattari; How Do You Make Yourself a Body Without Organs?

  At any rate, you have one (or several). It’s not so much that it preexists or comes ready-made, although in certain respects it is preexistent. At any Tate, you make one, you can’t desire without making one. And it awaits you; it is an inevitable exercise or experimentation, already accomplished the moment you undertake it, unaccomplished as long as you don’t. This is not assuring, because you can botch it. Or it can be terrifying, and lead you to your death. It is nondesire as well as desire. It is not at all a notion or a concept but…

Félix Guattari | IN FLUX

  Maurice Nadeau: Could you briefly explain how your collaboration came into being? Félix Guattari: This collaboration is not the product of a simple meeting of two individuals. Aside from a combination of circumstances, we were also led to it by a whole political context. Initially it was less a question of pooling knowledge than the accumulation of our uncertainties, and even a certain distress in the face of the turn of events after May ’68. We are part of a generation whose political consciousness was born in the enthusiasm and naiveté of the Liberation, with its conspiratorial mythology of…

Alain Badiou; On Pier Paolo Pasolini

DESTRUCTION, NEGATION, SUBTRACTION The abstract contents of my lecture is a very simple one. I can summarize it in five points: All creations, all novelties, are in some sense the affirmative part of a negation. “Negation”, because if something happens as new, it cannot be reduced to the objectivity of the situation where it happens. So, it is certainly like a negative exception to the regular laws of this objectivity. But “affirmation”, affirmative part of the negation, because if a creation is reducible to a negation of the common laws of objectivity, it completely depends on them concerning its identity….

Jacques Rancière; Politics and Aesthetics

Peter Hallward: Sometimes you present political practice as a sort of ex nihilo innovation, almost like the constitution of a new world, even if the world in question is extremely fragile, uncertain, ephemeral. Don’t you need to consider political innovation alongside the development of its conditions of possibility? I mean, for instance, on the political side of things, the role played by civic institutions and state organisations, the public space opened up, in Athens, in France, by the invention of democratic institutions (that is, the sort of factors you generally relegate to the sphere of the police, as opposed to…

Jacques Rancière; The Emancipated Spectator (5th International Summer Academy)

  I gave to this talk the title: « The Emancipated Spectator » . As I understand it, a title is always a challenge. It sets forth the presupposition that an expression makes sense, that there is a link between separate terms, which also means between concepts , problems and theories which seem at first sight to bear no direct relation on each other. In a sense, this title expresses the perplexity that was mine when Marten Spangberg invited me to deliver what is supposed to be the “keynote” lecture of this academy. He told me that he wanted me…

PIERRE GUYOTAT; BODY OF THE TEXT

BODY OF THE TEXT THIS IS NOT WRITTEN. BUT DICTATED. IMPROVISED. NOTEBOOKS IN HAND— NOT FOR A STOCKTAKING OF PAST OR PRESENT JOTTINGS ON WHAT I AM ABOUT TO DESCRIBE: THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MASTURBATION AND WRITING— BUT IN ORDER TO SPEAK TEXT IN HAND AND EXPOSED TO VIEW—; NO USE EXPECTING THEN. A TEXT THAT MIGHT BE DESCRIBED AS “SCHOLARLY” OR “MARGINAL” (NECESSARY TERMS AT AN EPOCH DETERMINED BY POLITICAL ENGAGEMENTS OF AN ADMINISTRATIVE KIND. OR BY A HESITATION TO EXPRESS THE MOST VOCAL SOUNDINGS OF THE MASTURBATORY TEXT). NONETHELESS, THE NEED TO MAKE MY FIRST DECLARATIONS ON THE RELATIONSHIP…

Democracy. Jean-Marie Gleize / Rimbaud / Kristin Ross

  Jean-Marie Gleize Democracy There is, in Rimbaud’s Illuminations, a text called “Democracy.” We know little of this text’s composition, as the manuscript is lost. It was published belatedly in a journal (La Vogue, 1889), but we are scarcely surprised to encounter a text of this title from the quill of that democrat Rimbaud, virulently hostile to Napoléon III’s dictatorship, radically aligned with the insurrectionary movement of the Paris Commune — with, one might say, an insurgent, revolutionary democracy. As Bernard Noël has suggested, Rimbaud is a communard “not only in his opinion, but in his being.” Now the particularity…

Miyó Vestrini | Poems

  XII (from NEXT WINTER) for Luis Camilo I get up I do not get up They hate me I tie my tubes I hit a motorcyclist with malice aforethought I surrender to the Oedipus complex I wander I carefully study the differences between dysrhythmia – psychosis – schizophrenia – neurosis – depression – syndrome – panic and I’m pissed left alone in the house when everyone is asleep I buy a magazine that costs six dollars they steal my best friend’s purse they grab me I push him I murder him I remember the umbrella of Amsterdam and the…

Deleuze & Guattari; Capitalism: A Very Special Delirium

    Actuel: When you describe capitalism, you say: “There isn’t the slightest operation, the slightest industrial or financial mechanism that does not reveal the dementia of the capitalist machine and the pathological character of its rationality (not at all a false rationality, but a true rationality of this pathology, of this madness, for the machine does work, be sure of it). There is no danger of this machine going mad, it has been mad from the beginning, and that’s where its rationality comes from.“ Does this mean that after this ‘abnormal’ society, or outside of it, there can be…

Galina Rymbu | Poems

UNTITLED I change at Trubnaya metro and see — fire I get off at the university and see — fire I go down the escalator at Chistye Prudy and see — fire when we fall at Begovaya, at Vykhino, we see — fire, fire, fire boys and girls their eyes filled with blood (to hell with ’68) students in hats with pompons walking silently next to me and suddenly they start to shout: “FIRE! FIRE! FIRE!” suffocating in dark leggings the universities flare up the textbooks of cowardly literature mixed with lusterless works flare up along with me only tonight we became younger and everyone wants to be…

Jean-Marie Gleize; ELEVEN NOVEMBER 2008 / ANARCHY / STATIC SHOTS / CAUGHT IN THE WATER / BEYOND VOICE

  2. ELEVEN NOVEMBER 2008 That night the wind was blowing above the ferns. The sky had fallen like a metal shutter. The scene was almost invisible and mute. One could hear footsteps. * … knocking over, bit by bit, all the obstacles … making each sentence into a fire stand     “the folly of an order” On eleven November at 5 a.m. the police cross Toy-Viam with dogs. The five access roads to the village of Tarnac are blocked. The village is sealed. A helicopter surveys the zone. 150 policemen 60 from the sdat (sous-direction de l’antiterrorisme) 50…

Sean Bonney | Our Death

  Our Death / Abject 2 (after Baudelaire) Great love, that will crush the human world, I wish we could do something to help each other. But today we are separated by so many tedious enemies. They smile at us all day long and ask us about our fever. What is there to say?  That “fever”,  in the way they pronounce it, isn’t much more than a weird reflection of their smile, which in itself is a symbol of their sense of rightness within the so-called world. But that we feel that the five characters that make up the word…

Best books of 2017

Nanni Balestrini; Blackout / Commune Editions Heriberto Yépez; Transnational Battle Field / Commune Editions Attila József; Liste freier Ideen / roughbooks Ursula Andkjaer Olsen; Third-Millennium Heart / Action Books / Broken Dimanche Press Sean Bonney; Ghosts / Materials Georges Didi-Huberman; Die Namenlosen zwischen Licht und Schatten / Fink Pierre Guyotat; In der Tiefe / diaphanes Aimé Césaire; The Complete Poetry of Aimé Césaire / Wesleyan University Press The Invisible Committee; Now / Semiotext(e) Mark Fisher; The Weird and the Eerie / Repeater François Dosse; Gilles Deleuze Félix Guattari / Turia + Kant Harun Farocki; Zehn, zwanzig, dreißig, vierzig. Fragment einer Autobiografie /…

Anna Mendelssohn; What a Performance

    […]   __   Location:                  A Dark, Freezing Dungeon. England. Late 20th Century. Political Climate:  The Depression. Prisoner’s number:971226 ¹ flashbacks numerous.     assume dialogue except where obviously otherwise.   Go on write / I can’t write / You told me you could write / I could before I told you / I didn’t tell you I could, I told you I / I can’t say anymore, he’s armed with credentials and dangerous.² Why bring back torture? Because it is continuing / […] Never speak to another poet. Never breathe a…

Theater der Grausamkeiten [6.1 / 6.2]

              Ich hätte Blut durch den Nabel scheissen müssen, um zu erreichen, was ich will. Artaud   All das um zu sagen dass Tzara Artauds Stab berührte als berührte er seinen Schwanz wodurch er im Übrigen nur einen weiterer Schrein geistiger Masturbation errichtet, einen Schatten den man mit ein paar Nägeln im Kopf des Suchenden fixiert, dass Artaud während der neun Jahre die das Gesetz ihn festsetzt / einer Justiz die nur als letzter eitriger Ausfluss einer bourgeoisen Krätze auftritt / ihn bindet, 50 Elektroschocks aussetzt und ins hyperglykämische Coma spritzt, dass die Gesellschaft…

Jean-Marie Gleize | “Where do the dogs go?”

  ‘Où vont les chiens ? ’, ‘Where do the dogs go?’,1 this question is posed by Baudelaire in the last ‘prose’ poem (in Spleen de Paris) in order to evoke a kind of literature that would correspond with urban, modern life – a kind of poetry which is adapted to those ‘sinuous ravines’ of the cities where the ‘poor’ roaming dogs are, the famished dogs. This question is also relevant to poetry: ‘where does poetry go?’, ‘where do the poets go?’. This question has troubled me for far too many years, and this is the reason why I cannot separate my poetic…

Antonin Artaud | The Return of Artaud, The Mômo

  The anchored spirit, screwed into me by the psycho- lubricious thrust of the sky is the one who thinks every temptation, every desire, every inhibition. o dedi o dada orzoura o dou zoura a dada skizi o kaya o kaya pontoura o ponoura a pena poni It’s the penetral spider veil, the female onor fur of either or the sail, the anal plate of anayor. (You lift nothing from it, god, because it’s me. You never lifted anything of this order from me. I’m writing it here for the first time, I’m finding it for the first time.) Not…

Pierre Guyotat; Self-portrait

  “This self-portrait is dated March 1962. I had returned from a mission as radioman in the interior, in the Djurdjura, having received a warning from my comrades in the radio station. I already knew when I got out of the jeep that I was in for a bad quarter of an hour, a quarter of an hour that could last a whole lifetime. I came back, and saw a secret service or military police jeep. I immediately disappeared into our room. My buddies had already hidden my notes and a few of my things – soldier solidarity. I only had…

Pierre Guyotat | The Prison

    “This text was written at the end of 1962, after my return from Algeria. It stands under the immediate impression of Dostoyevsky’s The House of the Dead, and is the result of a paraphrase of a very bleak text fragment from Johann Sebastian Bach’s St John ­Passion, which I sung as a child. For me the text is the matrix for Tombeau pour cinq cent mille soldats.” P.G.   Our prison was encircled by marshland where birds and sick dogs came to die. At night we could hear their cries and death rattles. We could see nothing of…

Pierre Guyotat, Donatien Grau. To lay a hand on the shoulder of future victims …

Donatien Grau: I have a sense that, in your recent work, the question of humanity has become more and more explicit. There has been a series of titles—Humains par hasard [Humans by chance, 2016], Joyeux animaux de la misère [Joyous Animals of Misery, 2014], Par la main dans les Enfers [By the Hand into the Hades, 2016]—that echo one another and call our humanity into question. Where do you stand these days on this question? Pierre Guyotat: I’ve always dealt with that question. It’s nothing new, and it necessarily lies at the core of every work of art. To begin…

READING LIST [08/2017]

Atlantic Drift; An Anthology of Poetry and Poetics Francois Dosse; Gilles Deleuze, Félix Guattari Maurizio Lazzarato; Marcel Duchamp and The Refusal of Work Bertolt Brecht; Arbeitsjournal Étienne Balibar; The Philosophy Of Marx Pier Paolo Pasolini; The Selected Poetry Of Pier Paolo Pasolini Pier Paolo Pasolini; Unter freiem Himmel Collected Works of Velimir Khlebnikov Sean Bonney; Letter Against the Firmament MÜTZE # 16 URS ENGELER (Robert Kelly, Jerome Rothenberg, et al.) Georg Baselitz, Alexander Kluge; Weltverändernder Zorn Ellen Meiksins Wood; Das Imperium des Kapitals

PROTEST

  1. aus dem Inneren des silbern glänzenden Berges zwischen Charleville und Aden hört man schwach das schleppende Geräusch von Dampfmaschinen ein heiss-wässriger Dampf entfährt aus einer der Öffnungen des Tunnels der sich in kleinen flockigen Partien zu Wolken verdichtet die in der gleissenden Sonne materialisieren und sogleich wieder sich auflösen überall handelt man mit Bergkristallen oder seltsam anmutenden Stücken von Mineralien die man unten in der Stadt für einen weitaus höheren Preis wieder verkauft aber bei Schnee und zu Fuß den Pass zu überqueren ein solcher Vorsatz dass einem an Bart und Augenbrauen Eiskristalle richtige Zapfen anwachsen ist keine…

COLOSSAL YOUTH / JUVENTUDE EM MARCHA

  Stop the faking (Vanda Duarte) Fuck this mountain … I rembered what Mr Lubitsch said, that the day you find out how to shoot a mountain, you will shoot a man. Uh-oh. I will never shoot a mountain. (Pedro Costa)   Erst schwarz und dann weiß ein Messer wie eine Fackel im Dunklen woran sich das Licht entzündet dann wieder schwarz für einen Augenblick Spinnen unter der Decke Schatten unter Schatten unsichtbar wie der Wechsel von Hell Dunkel Chiaroscuro im Stile Rembrandts Texturen grau-grüner Schlieren Maserungen käferfarbener Mauerflecke einer heruntergekommenen Wohnung Phantasie und Begeisterung der Bewohner im Erkennen von…

Die identitären Idioten

            Neulich die identitären Idioten der nouvelles nouvelles droite: notre maitre à penser est Pasolini et à sa suite Gramsci. Rechter Gramscismus! (Wie lange hat Gramsci in faschistischen Kerkern gesessen?) Man bekommt eine Gänsehaut sieht man, wie sie sich scheibchenweise in Werken anderer bedienen. Alle, die nett gekleidet daherkommen und ihre Fahnen schwenken, deren Symbol ein Scheisshaufen ist (so Pasolini), anders ausgedrückt, alle die dich deinen Freund nennen und den Neigungswinkel ihres Daseins verkennen, alle die immer noch glauben, dass nur 1 bestimmtes Areal im Gehirn für bestimmte Funktionen verantwortlich ist, deren geistige Offenbarung sich in…

LA RABBIA //PASSION PASOLINI

  «Haltet ihn gut fest, auch wenn er in seiner glühenden Hast versucht sich loszumachen; er wird alle Formen annehmen, sich in alles verwandeln, was auf der Erde kriecht, in Wasser, in göttliches Feuer; aber ihr müsst ihn festhalten, ohne nachzulassen; packt ihn noch fester; und wenn er dann sprechen will, wird er wieder Züge annehmen, die ihr an ihm gesehen habt, als er eingeschlafen ist.» (Eidothea warnt Menelaos vor den Listen ihres Vaters Protheus, dem die Gabe der Prophetie nachgesagt wurde, sein Wissen jedoch mit niemanden zu teilen gedachte. Ein Meister der Verwandlung, entzog er sich den Fragen, indem er…

CELAN SPUREN (2)

PC Notizen vom 10. Mai 1968 : Nächtliche Herausforderungen, wie Pascals von Feuer illuminierte Nacht vom 23. November 1654 (tief eingenäht ins Futter seiner Jacke), ich spreche und schreibe (durchschreibe) aus einem Ensemble erhoffter Stimmen – aber nie mit gefalteten Händen – von zwei Stunden weißen durchsichtigen Explosionen, ein Vernunftzerkrachen im Jahr der Gnade (magnalia dei), Zündholzgedanken eben. Die imago als genealogische Praxis verstanden. Rembrandt ist einer der Malerkönige. Seine Technik des Verbergens, besonders in den späteren Selbstbildnissen, scheint uns eine umso größere Wahrheit zu offenbaren. Mal Zeuxis, mal Demokrit löst sich bei ihm alles in nichts auf. Die  …

CELAN SPUREN (1)

FIXIERUNG // LA BEAUTÉ DANS LA RUE 10. November 2013; Pjotr Pawlenski〈Moskau〉  Seine Hoden aufs Pflaster nageln (die Manifestation einer Abweichung) … schließlich, schickt das Volk keine Petitionen an die Kammern  Blanqui … der Staat, mein Lieber, packt dich bei den Eiern dein Körper wird mit weißen Laken verhüllt (die Neutralisierung der Abweichung) Es gibt eine Gesellschaft zur Bekämpfung der Russophobie, Leute, die sich dafür bezahlen lassen, dass sie sich unter die Macht legen (eine Art gesellschaftspolitischer Hurerei) … eine gewisse Dramatisierung, eine Inszenierung des Raumes, das Durchkreuzen einer Sakralität, den Schallraum der Macht zu durchbrechen. * * * Ein seltsamer Reflex,…

Best books of 2016 / Herausragende Bücher 2016

Pierre Guyotat; Herkunft (Diaphanes Verlag) Paul B. Preciado; Testo Junkie (b_books) Erin Moure; O Cadoiro (roughbooks) Pjotr Pawlenski; Der bürokratische Krampf und die neue Ökonomie politischer Kunst (Merve Verlag Berlin) Jacques Rancière; Politik und Ästhetik (Passagen Verlag) Daniel Bensaid; Ein ungeduldiges Leben (LAIKA Verlag) Andrew Duncan; Radio Vortex (Brüterich Press) Georges Didi-Huberman; Atlas oder die unruhige Fröhliche Wissenschaft (Wilhelm Fink) Rosmarie Waldrop; Ins Abstrakte treiben (Edition Korrespondenzen) Samuel Beckett; Wünsch Dir nicht, daß ich mich ändere (Suhrkamp Verlag) Tom McCarthy; Satin Island (Deutsche Verlags-Anstalt) Robert Kelly; Die Sprache von Eden (roughbooks) Cyrus Console; Brief Under Water (Brüterich Press) Sophie Wahnich; Freiheit…