Jacques Rancière | History, Politics, Aesthetics (Edited by Gabriel Rockhill & Philip Watts)

→  PDF Editor(s): Gabriel Rockhill, Philip Watts Contributor(s): Gabriel Rockhill, Kristin Ross, Alain Badiou, Eric Mechoulan, Giuseppina Mecchia, Jean-Luc Nancy, Étienne Balibar, Todd May, Yves Citton, Peter Hallward, Bruno Bosteels, Solange Guenoun, Tom Conley, Rajeshwari Vallury, Andrew Parker, James Swenson, Jacques Rancière, Philip Watts The French philosopher Jacques Rancière has influenced disciplines from history and philosophy to political theory, literature, art history, and film studies. His research into nineteenth-century workers’ archives, reflections on political equality, critique of the traditional division between intellectual and manual labor, and analysis of the place of literature, film, and art in modern society have all constituted major contributions to contemporary thought. In this collection, leading scholars in the fields of philosophy, literary theory, and cultural criticism…

Kristin Ross | Against commemoration: Unearthing the lives and afterlives of May ’68

Thread:In May ’68 and its afterlives (2002), you described France’s ‘68 as a “union of intellectual contestation with workers struggles.” Left formations today struggle to create programs of action that unite peoples of different sectors of society. What should the Left know about the political struggles that unfolded in May 1968 in France? What thought and action enabled the coalescence of forces in ‘68? Ross: Well, that changes all the time, doesn’t it? The past is very unpredictable and its ability to connect with our current situations is often indirect and somewhat aleatory. When I wrote my book, for example, at…

CRISIS AND CRITIQUE / 50 Years after May 68

    Introduction: 50 Years After May 68, Frank Ruda & Agon Hamza PDF Table of Contents   The Double Heritage of Communism to Come. 1917-1968-2018 by Bini Adamczak  PDF 1968-2018, or from the “revolution impossible” to the impossibility of revolution? Variations on the objet petit s by Eric Alliez  PDF Scattered Notes on “May 68” And its interpretations by Étienne Balibar  PDF The procedure of its Invention, the Construction of its Form, the Means of its Transmission by A. J. Bartlett  PDF Topicality of May 68 by Daniel Blanchard  PDF Will it Happen Again? Boredom, Anxiety and the Peak of Human Evolution by Franco “bifo” Berardi  PDF To Make the…

Jacques Rancière; The Emancipated Spectator

Jacques Rancière; The Emancipated Spectator (Full book) The theorists of art and film commonly depict the modern audience as aesthetically and politically passive. In response, both artists and thinkers have sought to transform the spectator into an active agent and the spectacle into a communal performance. In this follow-up to the acclaimed The Future of the Image, Rancière takes a radically different approach to this attempted emancipation. First asking exactly what we mean by political art or the politics of art, he goes on to look at what the tradition of critical art, and the desire to insert art into…

Kristin Ross; May ’68 and its Afterlives

Kristin Ross; MAY ’68 AND ITS AFTERLIVES (Full book) During May 1968, students and workers in France united in the biggest strike and the largest mass movement in French history. Protesting capitalism, American imperialism, and Gaullism, 9 million people from all walks of life, from shipbuilders to department store clerks, stopped working. The nation was paralyzed—no sector of the workplace was untouched. Yet, just thirty years later, the mainstream image of May ’68 in France has become that of a mellow youth revolt, a cultural transformation stripped of its violence and profound sociopolitical implications. Kristin Ross shows how the current…

Democracy. Jean-Marie Gleize / Rimbaud / Kristin Ross

Jean-Marie Gleize Democracy There is, in Rimbaud’s Illuminations, a text called “Democracy.” We know little of this text’s composition, as the manuscript is lost. It was published belatedly in a journal (La Vogue, 1889), but we are scarcely surprised to encounter a text of this title from the quill of that democrat Rimbaud, virulently hostile to Napoléon III’s dictatorship, radically aligned with the insurrectionary movement of the Paris Commune — with, one might say, an insurgent, revolutionary democracy. As Bernard Noël has suggested, Rimbaud is a communard “not only in his opinion, but in his being.” Now the particularity of…